How to Tell Friends and Coworkers That You Are In Recovery

In March 23, 2021
How To Tell Friends And Coworkers That You Are In Recovery
How to Tell Friends and Coworkers That You Are In Recovery

How to Tell Friends and Coworkers That You Are In Recovery

Now that you are sober, you may start running into situations in which you have to explain to friends and coworkers that you are in recovery. Thanks to the stigma of addiction, this can be uncomfortable or anxiety-provoking for many individuals. The good news is, there are ways you can comfortably have this conversation whenever you are ready. Keep reading for tips on how to tell friends and coworkers that you are in recovery.

How to Tell Friends and Coworkers That You Are In Recovery: Take it Slow

If you are newly sober, it is important that you take it slow when it comes to telling friends and coworkers that you are in recovery. This is especially true if they notice that you have been gone for a period of time while you were visiting one of the best rehab centers in the US. There are a couple of reasons for this.

First off, having these discussions very early on in your recovery journey can be triggering. If you bring up the fact that you are sober at an event or function with your friends and coworkers, many people see it as a challenge to “break” you or “test” your sobriety. You may want to take it slow and wait to put yourself in these situations until you are more stable and ready to take them on.

In addition, relapse is a very real part of recovery — especially in early recovery. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, relapse rates for substance use disorders is 40-60%. This means that relapsing could be a very real possibility for you, and your friends and coworkers may not understand this if you end up needing another detox and treatment stay along your journey. By waiting until you are more solid in your routine and aftercare, you are setting yourself up for the best chances of long-term recovery.

Be Ready

One of the most important parts of telling friends and coworkers that you are in recovery is making sure that you are ready to do it. This might sound simple, but you could find yourself in a situation where you aren’t ready to divulge. Tips for handling these situations include:

  • Be ready to turn it down. If you are at an event or function where substances are offered to you, remember that “No” can be used as a full sentence. You can also make up a white lie, such as you want to have an early night, need to drive safely, or are waking up early the next day and would rather not indulge.
  • Be ready for questions. If you do decide to open up and let friends and coworkers know that you are in recovery, they may have questions for you. While they are mostly good-natured, they can be triggering for some people. Be ready to handle those by rehearsing answers with your sober support so that you are prepared.
  • Be ready to lose friends. Some of your friends may not understand your new lifestyle, will judge you for it, or will try to “break” you of your sobriety. Through this, you will understand who your true friends and support people are, and you just might have to be ready for that change.

Be Confident

Your new life is a happy life. You are free from the prison that substances held you in, and you were able to break free. Sure, you may have experienced some negative consequences due to your addiction along the way, but you are overcoming them. Everyone has a past and, just because yours has something to do with addiction, this doesn’t mean you should be ashamed of yours. You are living a healthy, happy life and should be very proud of yourself.

Say as little or as much as you want about visiting one of the best treatment centers in the US, learning new hobbies along the way or the wonderful people you have met throughout your journey.

By feeling guilty or shameful about your own recovery, you may be opening the door to relapse. Confidence is key when talking about your recovery journey, so others can see that a sober life doesn’t have to be a boring one. By seeing how happy and fulfilled you are, you will be breaking down the stigma of addiction one person at a time.

About Seasons in Malibu

The most important part of how to tell friends and coworkers that you are in recovery is to make sure you do not say anything that you are uncomfortable with. By feeling uncomfortable, you may become triggered, which can lead to relapse. If you need more help dealing with these feelings, we are here for you. Our philosophy is grounded in the understanding that in order for the client to heal, the entire system needs the opportunity to heal along with them. Whenever practical, we try to include close loved ones in sessions and in the entire process of recovering from addiction and/or addressing mental health issues.

It is a priority for us that our life-changing drug and alcohol treatment be available to the people who need it. We are fully familiar with how much strength and courage it takes to pick up the phone and ask for help. Our counselors are invested in your well-being and are ready around-the-clock to guide you or a trusted friend or family member through the initial steps of overcoming drug or alcohol addiction.

With our superior team of clinicians, we are able to succinctly pinpoint those areas of focus that will give the client the most advanced opportunity for success. Our approach towards healing is collaborative, comprehensive, and committed.

For more information, visit seasonsmalibu.com