Drug Rehab 2021 Round 1 – The things I’ve Seen

Name: Ryane Christine Criswell
From: Frisco, Texas
Votes: 0

The things I’ve Seen

You would not believe some of the things I’ve seen as a nurse in the operating room. I have seen people become paralyzed because they shot up one too many times in their spine, and their current infection is causing them to lose the use of their legs. I have seen people with brain bleeds from passing out and hitting their heads after shooting up. I have seen major abscesses in both the brain and spine from shooting up in random areas of the body. I’ve seen people lose their arm or leg from developing infections related to shooting up or losing blood supply to that limb from destroying their arteries and veins. The things I’ve seen related to drugs are something that the average person or average user could never comprehend. They are things I would never wish on anyone, or for any family to have to endure while their loved one suffers these tragedies. These are things that happen when people let things go too far. These are things that happen when we let people get too disconnected, and our society is currently in a state of constant disconnection. We are the most connected, disconnected culture that has ever been.

We are connected to devices rather than each other, and that constant struggle of reaching for the human interaction on the other end of the phone or tablet or laptop, is what is driving our loved ones over the edge. Rather than reality setting in of their loneliness or inability to connect, they reach for the pipe or needle and drift away to a state of mind where nothing matters and rejection can’t be felt anymore. A place where most of us, thankfully, have never been, and a place we should be thankful that we have never connected to; For it seems that once you make that connection, it’s almost impossible to find your way back.

If we, as a society, could make more of an effort to put our devices down and connect face-to-face once again; Attempt, together, to make more personal connections. It is then, that we might start seeing some real progress in relation to the number of drug-related incidents. We need to start turning to each other rather than a screen, or a pipe or needle. When we take the time to connect and spend time experiencing one another again, then the things we will see won’t be the horrors that I’ve witnessed in the operating room—but instead, love.